Mob Psycho 100: A Psychosocial Look at Shigeo Kageyama

Mob Psycho 100 is a fun series.

Centered around the story of Shigeo Kageyama, aka Mob, the overpowered psychic youth who just wants to live his life, Mob Psycho 100 wows its audience in multiple ways.  Animation-wise, it’s fantastic, conceptually, it is intriguing, and its characters are engaging and fun.  That being said, our main character is not quite like most other series.

Mob’s a very interesting main character- he’s not designed to be very attractive, he’s not funny for the most part, and comes off as disinterested, when other main characters are passionate and engaged.  He’s an odd one, and I think, given his odd personality, and very restrained nature, he’d be quite an interesting person to psychoanalyze.

Now, this post is going to be a LONG one.  There is a lot to explain about Mob’s psyche, but that just makes it all the more interesting.  Hope you’ll join me for the ride- let’s get into the psychology of Shigeo Kageyama.

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The Legend of Zelda: A Psycho-Analysis of The Usurper King

Anyone else hype to play the Switch?

Anyways, in honor of the release of the Switch, and of course, The Legend of Zelda, Breath of The Wild, I wanted to take a look at one of the best one-time villains of the series, Zant.

Zant, The King of Shadows, the Usurper King, was featured in the game, Twilight Princess, as seemingly the main villain.  Cold, intimidating, and powerful, Zant was extremely effective at being a dreaded presence for the player to confront, he was an antagonist that had tangible presence throughout the game.  However, come his actual boss battle, the facade drops, and he seems to go wild- throwing child-like tantrums, screeching maniacally, hopping around the battlefield, Zant displays his true nature as a psychotic lunatic.

That all being said, this behavior made me curious- what kind of person is Zant, really?  What caused him to be this way?  And of course, honestly, just what the heck is wrong with him?  Well, that’s what I’ll be exploring today-just what is the psychology of The Usurper King?

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Orange: Kakeru’s Depression, and an Application to Real Life

Warning: With this topic, I write rather honestly and personally on thoughts involving Depression, and as such, makes for a longer, more emotion-driven post.  It shouldn’t be anything too heavy, but if that’s not your thing, just wanted to give you a heads up!

Okay, so, Orange.

Kakeru, the central focus of Orange’s plot, spoke to me a lot.  His depression was depicted in a very real, tough way, that I know resonated with many other people as well.

It’s a great anime, that tackles a tough topic- Depression- but does it do it well?  How accurate is it to real life, and is there truly something to be learned from it?  Well.  That’s what I’d like to talk about today- clinically, psychologically speaking, does Kakeru’s depression in Orange hold any weight?   And what, exactly, can we learn about real-life depression from this example?

This is going to be a bit of rough, long topic, so strap yourself in- let’s get to it!

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A Psycho-Analysis of the Tsundere

The Tsundere is an ever-present part of anime, undisputedly one of the most well-known character stereotypes, if not the most well known.  There are three other primary character types- the kuudere, the yandere, and the dandere, but let’s be honest, Tsundere is without a doubt the most well known and distinctive.  I mean, there’s tsundere maid cafes, tsundere shirts, and even a wikihow article on how to be a tsundere!

I think, generally speaking, we know what we like about seeing Tsunderes, right?  People have actually analyzed why we tend to like such characters, but it makes sense why they would be attractive anyways.  They manage to be cute, while still maintaining an aggressive vibe, making them extremely fun characters to watch.  The way in which such characters represent the extremes of aggressive behavior, and affectionate, almost shy behavior has proven to be quite interesting.  However, we’ve gotta ask- why do they behave that way?

Opinions of all kinds can be seen across the internet, putting forth the idea that the tsundere can exist in real life, or that tsunderes actually display Bipolar Disorder, that they display psychological “splitting,” among many other arguments.  As a psychology student, I’d like to pitch in my opinion on the character type- maybe provide a bit of a fresh perspective on the famous archetype.  Man, honestly, I’m really, really excited to share what I’ve found out, so, without further ado, let’s get to it!

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A Coming-of-Age Story: Bubbles, and Innocence in Steven Universe!

Steven Universe is a show that starts out strange, odd, completely weird, and grows to become something with ridiculous amounts of depth.  From the story of a young boy who has his powers triggered by Cookie Cat Ice Cream bars, to a complex tale of how the passing of one Rose Quartz has changed the lives of those close to her, Steven Universe has become one of the best series that Western Animation has to offer.  Every character is just so, so good, so well designed, so relatable.  However, it is through the titular character, Steven Universe, where we see the best thematic elements of what the show has to offer.

Steven starts off the series as a young kid, idealistic, always happy, and confident that everything will be alright.  As the series progresses, he never stops hoping for the best, but he’s forced to confront situations that make him rethink his view of the world, and grow dramatically.  The story of the Crystal Gems is ultimately Steven’s Coming-of-Age story, and there’s so much in the series that build it up as such.  There is one supernatural element of the story in particular that I feel epitomizes this growth, and that is the way the series uses bubbles.

There will be sizable spoilers here, as one might expect.  I’m just gonna talk about how bubbles in the series and what they mean in regards of Steven’s growth- analyze just how he grew, and how he might continue to grow. Hopefully, it’ll be pretty interesting!
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Overwatch: Diagnosing the Widow and the Reaper

Today, we’re going back to Overwatch for another look at the two most aggressive, murderous, and evil characters in the game: Widowmaker, and Reaper.  These two are the closest things we have to recurring antagonists, and it’s clear that their desire for violence and bloodshed is extraordinary.  Widowmaker’s profession as an assassin, and Reaper’s willingness to kill people simply because he can, speak to this fact, and lead many to label them as bloodthirsty psychopaths.  That being said, however, I’ve gotta ask, what really makes them “psychopathic,” what’s going on inside their heads?

I’ll just give you guys a quick look at how these two characters might be diagnosed in real life, and why they would be diagnosed so.  We’ll analyze their backstory, their character interactions, and even their voice lines to arrive at a conclusion that, although it might not be surprising, is certainly rather interesting.

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Life Is Money: Sensory Deprivation’s Effect on the Brain

It’s obvious: people go to extreme lengths for the sake of cash.  Most blatantly, people can rob a bank, a gas station, hold others up at gunpoint, but such desire for money can be shown in other means as well.  Questionable business decisions, moral ambiguity, participation in crazy game shows, money is quite often the motivating factor here.  How far then, would people be willing to go for a large sum of it?

Life is Money is a rather interesting manga, asking this question, along with far more philosophical, psychological topics that are rather interesting.  In a game where people kill each other by using “Mental Overs,” putting one’s body under huge stress through verbal attacks, there is a lot of room for clashing ideals, the effect of one’s history on who they are in the present and other such plot points.  However, one of the main parts of the game that was presented, I feel, didn’t get such an explanation and focus: the taking away of the five senses.

Every day the game went on, a dice would be rolled that decided whether you had to have one of your senses taken away, or you got off free for the day.  This allowed for some interesting psychological attacks, and made for rather unique plot points, but otherwise, this idea was not focused on explicitly, choosing instead to focus on character interaction and a mix of conflicts of their ideals, and psychological warfare.  However, I’d like to further delve into what makes taking away the senses so debilitating to an individual, and, in-universe, what would make them so much more likely to “Mental Over.”

So yes.  Today, we’re going to learn a bit more about neuroscience and psychology, relating to the ideas of sensory deprivation and solitary confinement.  And yes, there will be spoilers, but trust me, Life is Money will still make for an interesting read in spite of them.  Last thing before we get started: the manga does have some…creepy imagery, so if that’s not your thing, well, I warned ya.  Sounds good?  Aight.  Let’s get into it!

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Psycho Pass: How to Measure Criminality?

 

Heyo, Ayron here, and I’ve just gotta say I’ve been missing out on some great anime.  Haven’t been keeping up with recent ones as much as I’d like, Re:Zero, Orange, Erased, etc.  In place of those, I’ve been making my way through a series a good friend recommended to me: Psycho-Pass.

For those unaware, the whole series revolves around a very unique, controversial, and interesting feature: the ability to measure someone’s propensity for crime numerically.  If someone has a higher likelihood of committing a crime, then they have a higher “Psycho Pass” that reflects that.  Broken down specifically into Crime Coefficients, and Hues, if someone’s Coefficient is over 100, they qualify for instant incarceration.  If it’s over 300, instant execution.

Psycho-Pass tackles this theoretical world in quite an interesting fashion, and it’s actually something I became really curious about: would it actually be possible, psychologically speaking, to measure the likelihood of criminal behavior?  So I did some research, and…well, I think it’s pretty interesting, to say the least.

If you’re interested at all about this, then get ready to learn about some Criminal Psychology, and a little bit of basic biology while we’re at it.  I haven’t gotten through much of Psycho-Pass yet, so although there will be some details from the first few episodes, nothing too spoilery, don’t you worry! Continue reading “Psycho Pass: How to Measure Criminality?”

Lucid 9: Dissociation, Stress, and Breaking the Mind

Lucid 9.  I assume if you’re reading this now, you’ve already played through Lucid 9 and are looking for content on it.  But if you haven’t, here’s the rundown: it’s a visual novel centered around one Yama Ishimoto, who is dealing with the fallout of a series of murders, and the effect it is having on his school.  Being the protagonist he is he gets himself involved, without realizing that his crusade to discover the murderer may very well end with him becoming one.

I have a review here covering what I think of the visual novel, but if you’d rather not, just take my word for it: it’s pretty good.  What I love most about it though, is how it handles the psychology behind it all.  Considering Yama in particular, the story builds up in such a way that you really get a sense of just how messed up he becomes, and from a psychological point of view, it WORKS.

Yama struggles, faces conflict, and potentially loses his mind, and I’ll show you now how it all works.  This is going to be a comprehensive look at Yama’s mental state throughout the visual novel, so yes, there will be HUGE spoilers, and it’s gonna be a heavy read.  If you haven’t gotten through Lucid 9, I recommend you play through it first, or.  You know. You can play through it after.  Your choice fam.

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